recipes

3 Perfect Pastas

3 Perfect Pastas

It’s been a while since I’ve posted, not intentionally, as it’s been a busy year. I’m off next week overseas for about 7 weeks for business, so the family aren’t coming, and I’ve been slightly worried about how my husband is going to feed himself (opening a bottle of wine is not a problem). But when faced with a saucepan and the stove, he’s confused, and takeout is not an option in our family. We just don’t do it.

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Quicke’s Cheddar: Cloth-Bound In History

Quicke’s Cheddar: Cloth-Bound In History

Recently my husband and I had the pleasure of visiting Quicke’s in Devon: the makers of our favourite cheddar cheese. And, even better, were invited for a private tour of the Home Farm. For me it was like being a kid in the world’s best lolly shop.And inspired by their cheese I’ve included a recipe I developed after returning home.

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Coq au Vin. Revisiting a Classic: No. 1

Coq au Vin. Revisiting a Classic: No. 1

Coq au Vin, such a classic French dish, and one that I adore. Recently I realised it’s a dish you dont see around much anymore, and certainly not on restaurant menus. Maybe its gone out of fashion, considered boring perhaps – who knows? I tend to think however, no matter what the latest food fad, classic dishes like this are important to have in your repertoire. They are perfect with the right glass of wine, and are not too hard to make, provided you have a great stock, which I’m sure you’re sick of hearing about; I know I go on about it, but its important, so I have included it in the recipe below. Just remember, it’s a stew really it is.

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Red Velvet Borsch

Red Velvet Borsch

My grandmother and my aunt Tamara used to make a lot of Borsch. It would differ, depending on the time of year. At Lent, it was always without meat, and water was used as the base of the soup. Other times, beef bones and stewing beef were used, the meat shredded after cooking and put back into the soup. This version was hearty, delicious, and perfect during the colder months. My mother’s borsch was slightly different, although equally delicious, and, like my aunty Tamara’s and grandmother’s, was always served with a big bowl of sour cream and horseradish; so commonplace on a Russian table. 

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